MACROMEDIA CONTRIBUTE SIMPLIFIED WEB PUBLISHER
BOYCOTT RED CHINA PRODUCTS   BOYCOTT RED CHINA PRODUCTS
made in usa          Marietta Pennsylvania Militia          made usa
Preserving, Protecting, and Defending Marietta Pa
 
 
SMALLPOX:  VACCINE  SAID  TO  SIT  IN  GUARDED  MARIETTA  LAB
 
The  only  vaccine,  or  most  of  it,  may  sit  in  Marietta,
not  much  thought  of  until  bio-terroism  scares.
 
 
SUNDAY  NEWS  (LANCASTER,  PA.)
Sunday,  October  28,  2001
Section:  HEADLINE
Front  Page:  A-1
Byline:  Jon  Rutter
Sunday  News  Staff  Writer
 
 
 
State  police  help  watch  over  the  grounds.
 
 
      Company  officials  have  brainstormed  every  possible  security  threat,  according  to  state  Rep.  Thomas  Armstrong  of  Marietta.
 
      It's  little  wonder  that  Wyeth-Ayerst  Laboratories  Inc.,  along  the  Susquehanna  River  in  western  Lancaster  County,  has  stepped  up  security  in  the  wake  of  the  September  11  terrorist  attacks  in  New  York  and  Washington,  D.C.
 
      For  years,  the  laboratory  was  the  repository  for  the  nation's  only  reserve  of  smallpox  vaccine.
 
      Neither  Wyeth  nor  the  federal  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention,  which  owns  the  vaccine,  would  confirm  whether  it  remains  in  storage  here.
 
      But  the  decades-old  stockpile  could  become  pivotal  should  terrorists  unleash  the  deadly  smallpox  virus.
 
      Last  week,  researchers  were  poised  to  start  clinical  trials  that  will  determine  whether  the  existing  15.4  million  doses  of  vaccine  can  be  diluted  to  provide  75  to  150  million  doses.
 
      Testing  is  expected  to  be  completed  by  February,  said  a  National  Institute  for  Allergy  and  Infectious  Diseases  official,  who  asked  not  to  be  identified.
 
      Meanwhile,  on  Tuesday,  U.S.  Health  and  Human  Services  Secretary  Tommy  Thompson  asked  Congress  for  $509  million  to  buy  300  million  doses  of  new  vaccine  " so  every  American  will  be  assured  there  is  a  dose  with  their  name  on  it  if  it  is  needed. "
 
      No  fresh  vaccine  was  expected  to  be  available  before  mid-winter.
 
      Wyeth  spokesman  Doug  Petkus  said  he  couldn't  confirm  whether  new  vaccine  will  be  produced  in  Marietta.       But  he  said  the  government  and  the  laboratory  are  " in  discussion "  about  how  Wyeth  can  be  of  help.
 
      The  Feds  have  said  they're  unaware  of  any  specific  terrorist  threats  involving  smallpox.       No  decision  on  mass  innoculations  has  been  reached.
 
      For  Dr.  G.  Gary  Kirchner,  a  retired  Lancaster  surgeon  who  said  smallpox  poses  a  much  greater  danger  than  anthrax  and  other  bioterrorism  weapons,  public  access  to  vaccine  can't  come  soon  enough.
 
      " If  they  released  it,  I'd  be  in  line  in  a  second. "
 
      Regarded  as  the  planet's  most  efficient  biological  killer,  smallpox  is  thought  to  have  risen  in  Africa  10,000  years  before  the  birth  of  Christ.
 
      The  highly  contagious  virus  is  spread  most  easily  from  December  to  April,  when  dry,  cold  air  helps  it  stay  alive  longer.       Smallpox  kills  about  30  percent  of  those  who  contract  it,  and  often  disfigures  and  blinds  survivors.
 
      Eighteenth-century  Europeans  were  the  first  to  vaccinate  against  what  they  called  " the  speckled  monster, "  which  is  marked  by  fever,  rash  and  scab-covered  sores.
 
      The  Lancaster  County  Vaccine  Farm  started  by  Marietta  physician  H.M.  Alexander  in  the  late  1880s  was  once  the  world's  largest  smallpox  vaccine  producer  and  later  gave  rise  to  the  modern-day  laboratory  along  the  Susquehanna  River.
 
      Wyeth-Ayerst,  which  is  owned  by  American  Home  Products  in  Madison,  N.J.,  manufactured  the  country's  only  remaining  supply  of  vaccine  in  the  1970s.       Dryvax,  the  freeze-dried  virus  was  stored  in  rubber-stoppered  vials  at  20  degrees  below  zero  Centigrade.
 
      Many  people  alive  today  bear  a  coin-sized  scar  from  the  smallpox  vaccination  they  received  as  young  children.
 
      By  the  1970s,  however,  worldwide  vaccinations  had  eradicated  smallpox,  and  further  innoculations  were  deemed  unnecessary.
 
      American  companies  have  not  produced  smallpox  vaccine  since  the  1980s.       But  proposals  to  destroy  remaining  live  samples  of  the  virus  were  never  carried  out  for  fear  there  would  be  no  way  to  make  new  vaccine  in  an  emergency.
 
      That  may  have  been  prescient.
 
      " The  virus  lives  in  Moscow, "  Kirchner  noted.       " It  lives  in  CDC.       The  best  estimate  is  it's  in  Saddam  Hussein's  locker. "
 
      Because  smallpox  vaccine  loses  its  punch  after  about  10  years,  he  said,  and  because  today's  highly  mobile  citizenry  would  likely  spread  the  disease  widely  before  infection  was  detected,  smallpox  bioterrorism  could  be  catastrophic.
 
      Dr.  D.A.  Henderson,  a  top  government  bioterrorism  adviser  who  led  the  effort  to  eliminate  smallpox  25  years  ago,  told  " 60  Minutes "  newsman  Mike  Wallace  last  week  that  any  terrorist  effort  to  spread  smallpox  would  likely  focus  on  an  aerosol  form.
 
      In  Marietta,  Rep.  Armstrong  said,  the  company  that  made  the  vaccine  is  doing  everything  it  can  to  protect  its  resources  and  the  community.
 
      Last  week,  state  police  troopers  were  helping  to  patrol  the  Wyeth-Ayerst  grounds.
 
      " All  upper  management  and  security  forces  are  from  FBI  and  Secret  Service  backgrounds, "  Armstrong  said,  and  additional  private  security  personnel  were  brought  in  following  September  11.
 
      " Their  concern  is  to  make  sure  they're  protected  sideways,  overtop,  all  around.       They're  very,  very  concerned.       They're  not  afraid  because  they  know  what  ( safeguards )  they  have. "
 
      How  effective  the  Wyeth  vaccine  would  be  in  averting  an  epidemic  is  an  open  question.
 
      " We  have  15  million  doses  in  supply, "  CDC  spokeswoman  Bernadette  Burden  said  last  week  during  a  phone  interview.       " We  have  not  seen  anything  to  suggest  that  those  stockpiles  are  limited. "
 
      Two  years  ago,  according  to  newspaper  records,  another  CDC  spokeswoman,  Barbara  Reynolds,  denied  a  rumor  that  the  Wyeth  vaccine  was  deteriorating.       She  assured  a  reporter  that  the  material  was  potent  enough  to  be  diluted  into  150  million  doses.
 
      But  Reynolds  acknowledged  concern  about  the  effectiveness  of  existing  stores  of  vaccinia  immune  globulin,  or  VIG,  a  sister  drug  given  to  people  who  suffer  side  effects  from  smallpox  vaccine.
 
      At  the  time,  it  was  reported  that  the  VIG  supply  had  turned  a  " pinkish  hue. "
 
      Last  week,  the  Institute  for  Allergy  and  Infectious  Diseases  official  who  spoke  on  condition  of  anonymity  confirmed  that  VIG  potency  remains  unknown.
 
      Still,  the  government  is  keen  to  find  out  how  far  it  can  stretch  the  Wyeth  smallpox  vaccine.
 
      The  Center  for  Vaccine  Development  at  St.  Louis  University  School  of  Medicine  is  one  of  four  facilities  in  the  United  States  studying  the  safety  and  effectiveness  of  diluted  doses  of  Dryvax,  according  to  a  statement  from  the  university.
 
      Volunteers  are  to  be  innoculated  with  Dryvax  at  one-fifth,  one-tenth  and  full  strength  levels,  according  to  lead  investigator  Dr.  Sharon  E.  Frey.
 
      The  diluted  vaccines  could  potentially  protect  75  to  150  million  people,  according  to  the  university.
 
      Meanwhile,  Merck  Vaccines,  GlaxoSmithKline,  Aventis  Pharma  and  other  companies  have  briefed  the  Bush  administration  on  their  abilities  to  make  fresh  vaccine.
 
      Production  would  likely  have  to  start  from  scratch.
 
      According  to  a  1999  CDC  report,  the  traditional  method  of  creating  vaccine  using  a  scarified,  or  punctured,  calf  flank  is  no  longer  acceptable  because  the  process  invariably  introduces  microbial  contamination.
 
      Some  companies  have  said  they  cannot  meet  the  government's  timetable  unless  officials  indemnify  them  and  waive  some  regulations.
 
 
 
©  2001  SUNDAY  NEWS  (LANCASTER,  PA.)
 
 
*** end ***
 
 
Three Star Divider
 
 
 
 
 
NEWS:  -  Crows  Roost  Downtown;  Police  Resort  to  GunFire
 
 
 
 
BOYCOTT RED CHINA PRODUCTS   BOYCOTT RED CHINA PRODUCTS
made usa                                                                made in usa
 
 
 About Our Town | See Our Town | Where To Stay? | What's To Eat | What's To Buy? 
 Town Organizations | Happenings | Local Weather | Local News | Marietta Militia 
 Where Are We? | Emergency Services | Frame Main Page | Index Home Page 
 
Send questions and comments to: Webmaster@MariettaPA.com
 
 
made in usa                                                                made usa
BOYCOTT RED CHINA PRODUCTS   BOYCOTT RED CHINA PRODUCTS
 
 

HTML 4.0html            The author is a member of The HTML Writers Guild

 
MACROMEDIA CONTRIBUTE SIMPLIFIED WEB PUBLISHER
 
[Aaddzz AD INFO]SETI - The Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence[Aaddzz AD INFO]
 
[Aaddzz AD INFO]The Constitution Party[Aaddzz AD INFO]
 
[Aaddzz AD INFO][Aaddzz Advertisement][Aaddzz AD INFO]

[Aaddzz AD INFO][Aaddzz Advertisement][Aaddzz AD INFO]

[Aaddzz AD INFO][Aaddzz Advertisement][Aaddzz AD INFO]

 
webtrack